Richtfest in Telfs in Tirol

Feast of future residents in Telfs, Tyrol, Austria. New residential buildings already under roof! 3 July 2014.
Richtfest in Telfs in Tirol
Richtfest in Telfs in Tirol

Schloss Tirol - Castle Tyrol

Tirol Castle (German: Schloss Tirol, Italian: Castel Tirolo) is a castle in the municipality of Tirol near Meran, in the Burggrafenamt district of South Tyrol, Italy.
Tyrol Castle is Tyrol’s most historically important castle. Its owners, the Counts of Vinschgau, who were also known as the Counts of Tyrol, represented the region that was named after them for almost a thousand years. The castle was constructed between 1138 and 1160. Around 1270, Meinhard II /read here/prevails against the bishops of Tyrol, and unites the area under his name. He levied duties and a toll on all goods that pass. This was very lucrative. 
Schloss Tirol, Nordseite. Graphik von Carl Heyn, 1869.
The castle’s archaeological museum gives a good overview of the first human settlements in the Alpine region beginning in the seventh century B.C. Visitors will be appreciate the smelting furnace, still completely intact, that dates back to the Bronze Age. The circular wall, built around 1100, is generally among the oldest castle walls in existence today. Marble portals from the twelfth century shine in ancient splendour. Sculptures rich in symbolism are among the most original creations of Romanesque art in Tyrol. The chapel, which has frescoes that date to the thirteenth century, houses the oldest Tyrolean glass painting and a massive fourteenth-century crucifixion group carved from wood.
Tirol Castle
The decline of Tyrol Castle, which eventually only housed a castle attendant, chaplain and woodsman, began with the end of the 16th century. In the first half of the 17th century the entire northern side, where the royal suites were located, was removed – due to fears arising from the fragility of the moraine hill on which the castle stands. Eventually, in 1816 the city of Meran acquired the castle and subsequently gifted it to Emperor Franz I.
After the First World War the castle passed into the ownership of the Italian state and only changed hands again as a consequence of the Package Agreement in 1972. Today the regional government of the Autonomous Province has established its museum for culture and regional history there.
Text source
www.dorf-tirol.it
www.suedtirol.info 

Photo source 
www.marling.info
www.luxurytravelspots.com
www.de.wikipedia.org

Claudia de’ Medici Landesfürstin von Tirol

Claudia de' Medici (1604 – 1648) was Regent of the Austrian County of Tyrol during the minority of her son from 1632 until 1646. She was a daughter of Ferdinando I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany and Christina of Lorraine. She was born in Florence, and was named after her grandmother Claude of Valois, herself granddaughter of Claude, Duchess of Brittany, consort to King Francis I of France.

Her first husband Federico Ubaldo della Rovere, Duke of Urbino had installed his mistress, an actress, in the palace as well and had no intention of giving up his freewheeling way of life. Outraged, she fled to Pesaro. Only when Federigo promised to change did she return to Urbino. Here she bore her first child in 1622, a daughter, Vittoria – no heir to the throne, but proof of her promising fertility. With the sudden death of Federigo she had to leave Urbino and return to the convent. Harp strains replaced the music of opulent celebration.
Fortunately, her sister-in-law knew a of remedy for the wealthy 19-year-old widow. Her brother Leopold, a bishop and the sovereign of Tirol, was up to his neck in debt. Marriage would help both parties, and the age difference of 18 years was no impediment for a man of vigor. Leopold’s childhood portraits show a bright-eyed, happy little roly-poly, an unlikely candidate for celibacy or the ascetic life. The negotiations between the Habsburgs and the Medici eventually worked out to everyone’s satisfaction. Leopold the Pious, friend of the fine arts wanted to do just one more thing before giving his final assent: to see his bride-to-be face-to-face at least once, in all discretion. Claudia had fallen ill with the pox when she was 16. What if her pretty face had become deformed, her smooth skin covered with scars? To his great relief Leopold V did not have to answer this question. His bride too was content. She would marry a former cleric, free of sin and debauchery, strictness and abstemiousness. 
 Leopold V Habsburg. von Österreich

A Claudia de’ Medici should not lack for anything in Innsbruck, the capital of Tyrol. Court theater, horse ballet, boar hunts and lemons; Leopold even forbade public scourging for her sake. The Archduchess should not become upset; the precious baby she was carrying had to be protected at all cost. Between 1627 and 1632 she bore five children. 
Innsbruck today, Hofburg
At 28 Claudia de’ Medici was widowed a second time. This time she had no need to fear the convent’s walls – quite the opposite; the death of her husband brought unexpected opportunity. Leopold had decreed in his will that in the case of his demise she should continue to rule Tyrol. Before her son came of age she enjoyed an independent reign of fourteen years.
Tomb of Claudia de' Medici and Leopold V Habsburg in Jesuit church in Innsbruck, Tirol
The land Tyrol was deeply in debt and then there was the Thirty Years’ War. Troops of France and of the Swedish king threatened the borders of Tyrol. Claudia de’ Medici therefore arranged for a reform of the Tyrolian militia, had fortifications built up and concluded an alliance with Spain and Emperor Ferdinand II. In this way she was able to preserve Tyrol from the worst harm. In internal affairs too she developed ambitious plans. She wanted Innsbruck to become a clean city, free from dung and muck, garbage, and prostitution. Adultery was harshly punished, and those accused of witchcraft were prosecuted without mercy, but according to existing law. She immediately dismissed and punished an official who had abused a ten-year-old girl. She alone had the power to grant pardons and made active use of it. She commanded that those who were condemned to death on the wheel or through burning or impalement had to be put to death first. Women who had killed their babies were given milder sen-tences than before. Under her rule Innsbruck’s streets were paved, and preventive measures were taken against fires and epidemics. She fostered trade, developed fisheries and planted mulberry bushes for silk production.
Ruins of Porta Claudia fieldwork /Schanze/ in Leutasch, Tirol
“God sees everything,” was her life’s motto. Protestants and Jews were tolerated only to a limited degree. Whoever failed to go to confession she expelled from the country. Immediately after the end of the Thirty Years’ War she died from the effects of her edema.
Text sources: Wikipedia, www.fembio.org
Photos sources: www.innsbruck.antonprock.at, Elisabeth Fazel, Wojciech Gatz

Tirol Oberinntal Mundart Wörterbuch Deutsch - Englisch - Polnisch

The Dialect Dictionary of Tyrol Oberinntal, Austria /examples words/. About Tyrol speech and dialect read more Click Here
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To buy the original photo at a high resolution simply click the photography.

Tirol Oberinntal - German - English - Polish

Anger - Obstgarten -orchard - sad
Brugga - Brücke - bridge - most
Buhhof - Bahnhof - railway station - dworzec kolejowy    
Drissle - Kehle - throat - gardło
Erchti - Dienstag - Tuesday - wtorek
fohrn - fahren - drive - jechać
geal - gelb - yellow - żółty
Geaß - Ziegen - goats - kozy
griaga - bekommen - get, taken - dostać, otrzymać
Gugerrutz - Mais - corn - kukurydza
Gugitza - Augen - eye - oko
Hoachwetter - Unwetter - thunderstorm - burza z piorunami
Madl - Mädchen - girl - dziewczyna
Mantig - Montag - Monday - Poniedziałek
oda - oder - or - lub
Paunger - Pflaumen - plums - śliwki
Pfinztig - Donnerstag - Thursday - czwartek
schian -  schön - beautiful - piękny

Adrien Brody als Kaiser Karl V. Habsburg in der Film "Emperor"

An American actor Adrien Brody, the Oscar-winner has signed on to play the Charles V Habsburg in "Emperor," a Lee Tamahori film that explores the reign of the Roman Empire ruler. Filming hasn't started yet, but Adrien Brody is already starting to think about how he'll research his latest role as a 16th century emperor.
Charles V Habsburg and Adrien Brody. Source: www.olesnica.nienaltowski.net /L/ and Wikipedia, author David Shankbone /R/.
The film won't be a studious version of Charles V's time in power. Promotional materials promise a film that explores "wealth, debauchery, violent relations, sex, manipulation and treason" and Brody said it's not aiming to be a historical document.
Adrien Brody received widespread recognition when he was cast as the lead in Roman Polanski's The Pianist (2002) as a Władysław Szpilman. The role won him an Academy Award for Best Actor, making him, at 29, the youngest actor ever to win the award. He also won a César Award for his performance.
The director of the movie "Eperor" will be Lee Tamahori, a New Zealand filmmaker best known for directing the 1994 film Once Were Warriors and the 2002 James Bond film Die Another Day.


Charles V (1500 –1558) was ruler of the Holy Roman Empire from 1519 and, as Charles I, of the Spanish Empire from 1516 until his voluntary abdication in favor of his younger brother Ferdinand I as Holy Roman Emperor and his son Philip II as King of Spain in 1556. He stayed mainly in the Netherlands and in Spain, but his favorite city in Austria was Innsbruck, the capital of Tyrol. He said over my empire the sun never set.

New Tyrol Photos Available For Sale in May

New Tirol photos available to buy via Fine Art America. To buy Simply Click Photo! 
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Patriarch von Konstantinopel Bartholomeos I. in Tirol

Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople on vacation in Austrian Tyrol. Seefelder Plateau, March 2014. Fot.: Elisabeth Fazel.
His All Holiness, BARTHOLOMEW, Archbishop of Constantinople, New Rome and Ecumenical Patriarch is the 270th successor of the 2,000 year-old local Christian Church founded by St. Andrew. As a citizen of Turkey, Patriarch Bartholomew’s personal experience provides him a unique perspective on the continuing dialogue among the Christian, Islamic and Jewish worlds. He works to advance reconciliation among Catholic, Muslim and Orthodox communities, such as in former Yugoslavia, and is supportive of peace building measures to diffuse global conflict in the region.

As Archbishop of Constantinople and New Rome, Patriarch Bartholomew occupies the First Throne of the Orthodox Christian Church and presides in a fraternal spirit among all the Orthodox Primates. This includes the convening of councils or meetings, facilitating inter-church and inter-faith dialogues and serving as the primary expresser of Church unity as a whole. As Ecumenical Patriarch he transcends every national and ethnic group on a global level and today is the spiritual leader of approximately 250 million faithful world-wide.
His inspiring efforts on behalf of religious freedom and human rights, rank Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew among the world’s foremost apostles of love, peace and reconciliation for humanity, a reason for which he was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal by the U.S. Congress.